ON-LINE WITH CATHY NEY

     Since this issue of the journal is devoted to agriculture, I will share my initial look at the numerous agriculture sites on-line with you. First, when reading the site titles below, it will helpful to keep in mind that agriculture is an extensive field of study. It includes anything that is related to the production and processing of food - even environmental, fire safety, and citizen issues can be associated with agriculture. Because the list of agriculture-related topics is so vast, this column will deal only with government agencies that have developed Kid Pages.

United States Department of Labor: Mine Safety & Health Administration's Kids Page:  http://www.msha.gov/KIDS/KIDSHP.HTM

The Mine Safety and Health Administration's page was made with kids in mind. Its job is to protect those that work at mines - fathers, mothers, aunts or uncles. They put this page up so that children can explore and learn more about mining. USDA For Kids:
http://www.usda.gov/news/usdakids/index.html
The USDA For Kids site is amazing. It includes a varied menu from a weather watch to nature conservancy for kids. It is a great place to start your search of agriculture, because it also include a searchable data base, photos, and more cool links.


Ben's Guide to U.S. Government for Kids:
http://bensguide.gpo.gov/

Ben's Guide to U.S. Government for Kids offers activities for grade levels K-2, and 3-5. Here, elementary students can explore Benjamin Franklin as a printer, librarian, inventor, statesman, or view a timeline of his life.
The EPA's Environmental Links Page For Kids is a wonderful resource for students and teachers alike. It includes links from environmental issues to kids stuff to fun facts about fungi and lichen. It would take several columns just to investigate their many links.
United States Fire Administration Kids Page:
 http://www.usfa.fema.gov/kids/
The USFA stands for the United States Fire Administration. The USFA is part of the federal government. One of its jobs is to help prevent fires. It want everyone to be safe from fire. The USFA Kids Page is full of tips that can help children and their family be safe from fire.
Central Intelligence Agency's Homepage for Kids:
 http://www.cia.gov/cia/ciakids/sitemap.html
The index to the CIA Kid's Page provides an array of information that is sure to fascinate any child. Its menu includes: the CIA Seal, Who We Are and What We Do, Try a Disguise, Geography, History, CIA Canine, and Aerial Photography Pigeons.
National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences:
http://www.niehs.nih.gov/kids
The National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences (NIEHS) is a location where children can play fun games, enjoy some stories, sing along, color their world bright and beautiful, joke and laugh, unscramble science words, or contribute art and poetry while learning about the NIEHS..
United States Department of the Housing & Urban Development kids Next Door:
http://www.Hud.gov/kids/
The Kids Next Door is a place where kids can go to learn about being good citizens.
There they: Meet Cool People, See Neat Things, and Visit Awesome Places. This is a wonderful way to encourage citizenship skills in your students.
United States Department of Justice for Kids & Youth:
http://www.usdoj.gov/kidspage/
Justice for Kids in Grades K-5 menu entails: a FBI Field Trip, Internet Do's and Don'ts, Junior Special Agent, Truth About Drugs, Safety Tips from the FBI, and Working Dogs. It is an in-depth look how the justice system affects kids in America.