WATER LESSONS

1 Water Cycle  2 Water Cycle  3 Water Cycle  4 Water Cycle 
5 Water Cycle  6 Water Cycle 7 Survival of the Species 8 Survival of the Species
9 Survival of the Species 10 Sources of Energy 11 Life Cycle of a Tree  12 Survival of the Species
13 Survival of the Species 14 Survival of the Species 15 Survival of the Species 16 Plant and Animal Diversity
17 Plant and Animal Diversity 18 Plant and Animal Diversity 19 Animal Diversity 20 Plant and Animal Diversity
21 Plant and Animal Diversity 22 Plant and Animal Diversity 23 Study Food Chains 24 Food Chains
25 Animal Adaptations 26 Animal Adaptations 27 Animal Adaptations 28 Animal Behavioral and Physical Adaptations
29 Animal Behavioral and Physical Adaptations 30 Diversity of Plants and Animals Return to CES Homepage

Lesson 1: Water Cycle
"A Drop in the Bucket" Project WET p. 238


Water Cycle
Evaporation
Condensation
Precipitation

Objective:
Students will estimate and then calculate the amount of fresh water for human use on Earth.
Materials:
Flex tanks, mL containers, eye droppers, poster of the water cycle
Procedures:

  1. Read Magic School Bus at the Waterworks and do UNITES activity V2 (3) p. 34.
  2. a. Research each of the places Ms. Frizzle visited on the class trip.
    b. Write a description of one of the places visited.
  3. Use "Water Precious Water" (pp2-6): Aims to predict/actual percentage fresh water.
  4. Use 1,000 mL of water to represent Earth’s water.
  5. a. Pour mL of water out into a container to represent Earth’s fresh water.
    b. Pour 6 mL of 30 mL into a container to represent non-frozen water.
    c. Pour 1.5 mL of 6 mL into a graduated cylinder to represent surface water.
    d. Use eyedropper to remove a single drop of water to represent nonpolluted fresh water.
Evaluation:
Assess student abilities to accurately calculate percentages of water on Earth after doing the activity.
SOL:
  • Science:
  • 3.1 Plan and conduct investigations
    3.8 Study sequences and cycles in nature
    3.9 Study the water cycle
  • Math:
  • 3.14 Estimate and use actual measuring devices
    3.21 Collect data and construct a bar graph
    3.22 Read & interpret data in bar and picture graphs
  • English:
  • Oral Language:
    3.1 Use communication skills in group activities
    Reading/Literature:
    3.4 Use strategies to read a variety of printed materials
    Writing:
    3.7 Write descriptive paragraphs
    3.8 Write across content areas
    Research:
    3.10 Record information from resources
    Return to Lesson Index

    Lesson 2: Water Cycle
    "Water Models" Project WET p. 201

    Water Magic Lessons for Grades 1-3
    Take a Cool Tour of the Water Cycle!

    Objective:
    Students will construct models of the water cycle.

    Materials:
    Fry pan, ice, duct tape, 2-L plastic bottles, water, sand, rocks

    Procedures:

    1. Read Noah’s Ark by Peter Spier (explain and write about floods).
    2. a. Explain how the amount of water on Earth has not changed over time.
      b. Research and write a description of a flood in your area.
    3. Copy "Water Cycle in a Jar" and "Observation Sheet" pp. 204, 205 from Project WET.
    4. Adapt this activity to use 2-L plastic bottles, not glass jars.
    Evaluation:
    Evaluate student abilities to write an accurate description of what is happening in their water-cycle jar.

    SOL:

  • Science:
  • 3.1 Plan and conduct investigations
    3.8 Study sequences and cycles in nature
    3.9 Study the water cycle
  • Math:
  • 3.14 Estimate and use actual measuring devices
    3.21 Collect data and construct a bar graph
  • English:
  • Oral Language:
    3.1 Use communication skills in group activities
    Reading/Literature:
    3.4 Use strategies to read a variety of printed materials
    Writing:
    3.7 Write descriptive paragraphs
    3.8 Write across content areas
    Research:
    3.10 Record information from resources
    Return to Lesson Index

    Lesson 3: Water Cycle
    "The Long Haul" Project WET p. 260

    Water Cycle Play
    Facts About Ground Water

    Objective:
    Students will haul water to appreciate the amount of water used daily.

    Materials:
    Two-1 gallon (g) buckets, 2 garbage cans

    Procedures:

    1. Read The Legend of the Bluebonnet by Tomie de Paola (about too little water).
    2. a. Discuss how water was hauled before indoor plumbing.
      b. Research and write about fire departments at the turn of the century.
    3. Discuss a household of three uses 200 g (760L) of water daily.
    4. Play a water-hauling game.
    5. a. Divide class into teams of two.
      b. Each team gets 1g buckets in this relay.
      c. Haul water from source (spigot) to destination (garbage can) 150 feet away.
    6. Record results.
    7. a. Make comparisons using data.
      b. Draw conclusions.
    Evaluation:
    Assess student abilities to describe how water was transported before indoor plumbing.

    SOL:

  • Science:
  • 3.1 Plan and conduct investigations.
    3.9 Study the water cycle
  • Math:
  • 3.14 Estimate and use actual measuring devices
    3.21 Collect data and construct a bar graph
  • English:
  • Oral Language:
    3.1 Use communication skills in group activities
    Reading/Literature:
    3.4 Use strategies to read a variety of printed materials
    Writing:
    3.7 Write descriptive paragraphs
    3.8 Write across content areas
    Research:
    3.10 Record information from resources
    Return to Lesson Index

    Lesson 4: Water Cycle "Water Meter" Project WET p.271

    Objective:
    Students will construct water meters and calculate personal use.

    Materials:
    Copy Project WET p. 272, 5"x 7" index card, red and white ribbon, glue, scissors, ruler

    Procedures:

    1. Read Bringing the Rain to Kapiti Plain by Verna Aardema (about too little water).
    2. a. Research ways children can reduce the amount of water used.
      b. Compile a list of best water-use practices.
    3. Students track their water usage for one week.
    4. Record water use on a daily bar graph.
    Evaluation:
    Assess student abilities to calculate personal water usage at school and at home for one week.

    SOL:

  • Science:
  • 3.1 Plan and conduct investigations.
    3.9 Study the water cycle
  • Math:
  • 3.14 Estimate and use actual measuring devices
    3.21 Collect data and construct a bar graph
    3.22 Read and interpret data represented in graphs
  • English:
  • Oral Language:
    3.1 Use communication skills in group activities
    3.2 Present brief oral reports
    Reading/Literature:
    3.4 Use strategies to read a variety of printed materials
    3.5 Demonstrate comprehension of a variety materials
    Writing:
    3.7 Write descriptive paragraphs
    Research:
    3.10 Record information from resources
    Return to Lesson Index

    Lesson 5: Water Cycle
    "Money Down the Drain" Project WET p. 328

    Fish Stamp Image

    Objective:
    Students will observe and calculate water waste from a dripping facet.

    Materials:
    Copy "Money Down the Drain" worksheet & answer sheet Project WET p.331 and 332, calculators, stopwatches with second hands, graduated cylinder, 3-gallon milk jugs filled with 3 different colors of water

    Procedures:

    1. Read The Trip of a Drip by Vicki Cobb.
    2. a. Discuss the journey water takes from its source to its final destination, your facet.
      b. Write a simple explanation of the trip water takes to your facet.
    3. Discuss how a facet that leak 160 drops per minute uses 6 g of water per day.
    4. Assign two groups to each of three milk jugs.
    5. Record data on the worksheets.
    6. Compare results
    Evaluation:
    Evaluate student abilities to accurately measure the amount of water collected from a leaky faucet over a designated period of time.

    SOL:

  • Science:
  • 3.1 Plan and conduct investigations
    3.9 Study the water cycle
  • Math:
  • 3.14 Estimate and use actual measuring devices
    3.21 Collect data and construct a bar graph
    3.22 Read and interpret data represented in graphs
  • English:
  • Oral Language:
    3.1 Use communication skills in group activities
    Reading/Literature:
    3.4 Use strategies to read a variety of printed materials
    3.5 Demonstrate comprehension of a variety materials
    Writing:
    3.7 Write descriptive paragraphs
    Research:
    3.10 Record information from resources
    Return to Lesson Index

    Lesson 6: Water Cycle
    "The Incredible Journey" Project WET p.161

    Waterfall Image



    Objective:
    Students will simulate the movement of water within the water cycle.

    Materials:
    9-large papers, 9 boxes (make story cubes), whistle

    Procedures:

    1. Read and perform Experiments with Water by Ray Broekel.
    2. a. Discuss the difference between fiction and nonfiction books read.
      b. Try and record results of at least one experiment.
      c. Share the results of experiments.
    3. Discuss how water moves in three forms (liquid, gas or vapor, solid).
    4. Classify places water goes into nine stations: clouds, plants, animals, rivers, oceans, lakes, ground water, soil, and glaciers on nine pieces of paper around the room.
    5. Start equal numbers of players at each station.
    6. Roll the die (cubes) to determine where players (water) move.
    7. Discuss the probability of going to different stations .
    Evaluation:
    Evaluate student abilities to predict the mathematical probability of going from one station to another station.

    SOL:

  • Science:
  • 3.1 Plan and conduct investigations
    3.9 Study the water cycle
  • Math:
  • 3.23 Investigate probability of a given situation
  • English:
  • Oral Language:
    3.1 Use communication skills in group activities
    Reading/Literature:
    3.6 Read a variety of fiction and nonfiction selections
    Writing:
    3.8 Write across content areas
    Return to Lesson Index

    Lesson 7: Survival of the Species
    "A-maze-ing Water" Project WET p. 219

    Water Use Posters and Poster Data at No Cost!

    Objective:
    Students will investigate and understand how humans affect water quality.

    Materials:
    Option 1: Copy Project WET p. 222, can labeled "chemicals" or "oil", Post-it notes

     Procedures:

    1. Read The Wump Worldby Bill Peet.
    2. a. Discuss what happened to the Wump world.
      b. Write an explanation of what pollution does to the world.
    3. Option 1
    4. a. Draw a the maze (p. 222) with chalk on blacktop (gym tape on floor).
      b. Position sources of pollution (students stick Post-it) on water (students) running through the maze.
      c. Trap water at treatment system (like London Bridge) and remove pollutants (Post-it notes) before exiting the maze.
    5. Construct a graph of the number of students tagged with pollution in the water maze.
    6. Discuss the problems with run off (oil, chemicals, pesticides, fertilizers).
    7. Research ways pollutants can be disposed of safely.
    Evaluation:
    Assess student abilities to graph the number of pollutants in the water maze.

     SOL:

  • Science:
  • 3.1 Plan and conduct investigations
    3.10 Study the survival of the species
  • Math:
  • 3.14 Estimate and use actual measuring devices
    3.21 Collect data and construct a bar graph
    3.22 Read and interpret data represented in graphs
  • English:
  • Oral Language:
    3.1 Use communication skills in group activities
    Reading/Literature:
    3.4 Use strategies to read a variety of printed materials
    3.5 Demonstrate comprehension of a variety materials
    Writing:
    3.7 Write descriptive paragraphs
    Research:
    3.10 Record information from resources







    Return to Lesson Index

    Lesson 8: Survival of the Species
    "Pollution Search" PLT p. 114


    Objective:
    Students will examine pollution, its definition, its source, and what people can do to reduce it.

    Materials:
    Copy PLT p. 118, magazines, scissors, tape, poster board

    Procedures:

    1. Neighborhood Patrol:
    2. a. Imagine life without clean air or water.
      b. Lists pollutants (i.e., anything not naturally in the air, on land, or in water).
      c. Take students on outdoor walk; find evidence of pollution.
      d. Draw pictures of pollution.
    3. Read aloud The Cat in the Hat Comes Back by Dr. Seuss (showing pictures):
    4. a. Examine people’s attitudes toward pollution in the story.
      b. Write your own pollution and clean-up story.
    5. Collect pollution around the school grounds.
    6. Weigh and sort the pollution into one of three categories: reuse, recycle, or reduce.
    7. Make a class graph with pollution collected and staple it on a bulletin board.
    Evaluation:
    Assess student abilities to accurately weigh, categorize, and graph playground pollution

    SOL:

  • Science:
  • 3.1 Plan and conduct investigations
    3.10 Study the survival of the species
  • Math:
  • 3.14 Estimate and use actual measuring devices
    3.21 Collect data and construct a bar graph
    3.22 Read and interpret data represented in graphs
  • English:
  • Oral Language:
    3.1 Use communication skills in group activities
    Reading/Literature:
    3.4 Use strategies to read a variety of printed materials
    3.5 Demonstrate comprehension of a variety materials
    Writing:
    3.7 Write descriptive paragraphs
    Research:
    3.10 Record information from resources
    Return to Lesson Index

    Lesson 9: Survival of the Species
    "Deadly Waters" Project A/W p. 146


    Objective:
    Students will investigate different kinds of pollution that can affect life - including aquatic plants and animals.

    Materials:
    100 tokens (10 each) of different colors of ½" square construction paper pieces, graph paper, tape, pollution information sheet, 1/4 measure for paper tokens

    Procedures:

    1. Read Wonders of Rivers by Rae Bains.
    2. a. Discuss how friends of the rivers are protecting them from pollution.
      b. Compile a list of things people can do to keep our rivers clean.
    3. Activity:
    4. a. List four major categories (chemical, thermal, organic, and ecological) of pollution in rivers.
      b. Write descriptions of pollutants from "Pollutant Information Sheet".
      c. Group students in teams of three; each team sorts 1/4 teaspoon of tokens on the graph.
      d. Tell students that more than two tokens of any pollutant is harmful to aquatic life.
      e. Share graph results and conclusions with the class.
    Evaluation:
    Evaluate student abilities to categorize four major groups of pollution in rivers

    SOL:

  • Science:
  • 3.1 Plan and conduct investigations
    3.10 Study the survival of the species
  • Math:
  • 3.14 Estimate and use actual measuring devices
    3.21 Collect data and construct a bar graph
    3.22 Read and interpret data represented in graphs
  • English:
  • Oral Language:
    3.1 Use communication skills in group activities
    Reading/Literature:
    3.4 Use strategies to read a variety of printed materials
    3.5 Demonstrate comprehension of a variety materials
    Writing:
    3.7 Write descriptive paragraphs
    Research:
    3.10 Record information from resources
    Return to Lesson Index

    Lesson 10: Sources of Energy
    "Sunlight and Shades of Green" PLT p. 137

    Tree of Life Project

    Objective:
    Students will investigate and understand green plants ability to use sunlight to make their own food (photosynthesis).

    Materials:
    Foil, paper clip, indoor broad-leaf plant (e.g., geranium)

    Procedures:

    1. Read A Tree is Nice by Janice May Udry.
    2. a. Write a descriptive paragraph telling why a tree is nice.
      b. Share your paragraph with the class.
    3. Cut patches of aluminum to cover tree leaf (outdoors) or plant leaf (indoors).
    4. After four days, remove the patch and observe the leaf? ( a light spot appears on the leaf because foil blocked the sunlight and the plant’s ability to produce chlorophyll).
    5. Record results and conclusions in a log
    6. Read the imaginary field trip passage on PLT p. 138.
    Evaluation:
    Assess student abilities to transfer the photosynthesis experiment to a different green plant

    SOL:

  • Science:
  • 3.1 Plan and conduct investigations
    3.11 Study sources of energy
  • Math:
  • 3.14 Estimate and use actual measuring devices
  • English:
  • Oral Language:
    3.1 Use communication skills in group activities
    Reading/Literature:
    3.4 Use strategies to read a variety of printed materials
    3.5 Demonstrate comprehension of a variety materials
    Writing:
    3.7 Write descriptive paragraphs
    Return to Lesson Index

    Lesson 11: Life Cycle of a Tree
    "Tree Life Cycle" PLT p.302

    Beetle's Treehouse

    Objective:
    Student will investigate and understand the sequences and cycles of a tree.

    Materials:
    Art materials, copy of page 305, paper plate ("Tree Cookie p.291)

    Procedures:

    1. Read a variety of books such as The Giving Tree by Shel Silverstein, How the Forest Grew by William Jasperson, and Johnny Appleseed by William Kellog (PLT p.385).
    2. a. Compare fiction with nonfictional accounts of trees.
      b. Write a description of a tree’s life cycle.
    3. Sketch student life cycles.
    4. Draw tree life cycles (PLT p.303).
    5. a. Count the annual rings on the tree.
      b. Describe events in the tree’s life.
    6. Play "Plant Personification" (PLT p.303)
    Evaluation:
    Assess student abilities to transfer the life cycle of a tree to their life cycles.

    SOL:

  • Science:
  • 3.1 Plan and conduct investigations
    3.8 Study sequences and cycles in nature
  • Math:
  • 3.14 Estimate and use actual measuring devices
    3.21 Collect data and construct a bar graph
    3.22 Read and interpret data represented in graphs
  • English:
  • Oral Language:
    3.1 Use communication skills in group activities
    Reading/Literature:
    3.4 Use strategies to read a variety of printed materials
    3.5 Demonstrate comprehension of a variety materials
    Writing:
    3.7 Write descriptive paragraphs
    Research:
    3.10 Record information from resources
    Return to Lesson Index

    Lesson 12: Survival of Species "Playing Lightly on the Earth" Project WILD p. 292

    Extinction is Forever
    Recycling Coloring Book for Kids

    Objective:
    Students will investigate and understand games that are harmful and safe for the environment.

    Materials:
    Access to outdoors

    Procedures:

    1. Read Hop on Pop by Dr. Seuss.
    2. a. Write a rhyming game book.
      b. Share your rhyming game book with the class.
    3. Distinguish between games that are damaging and not damaging to the environment.
    4. a. Look for evidence of games that damage the playground environment.
      b. Invent a game that does not harm the environment (15 minutes).
      c. Share your environmental-safe game with the class.
    Evaluation:
    Access student abilities to invent games that are environmentally safe.

    SOL:

  • Science:
  • 3.1 Plan and conduct investigations
    3.10 Study survival of a species
  • Math:
  • 3.15 Tell time using a analog or digital watch
  • English:
  • Oral Language:
    3.1 Use communication skills in group activities
    Reading/Literature:
    3.4 Use strategies to read a variety of materials
    3.5 Demonstrate comprehension of materials
    Writing:
    3.7 Write descriptive paragraphs
    Return to Lesson Index

    Lesson 13: Survival of Species "Tropical Treehouse" PLT p.160

    Rainforest Needs Your Help!
    Passport to the Amazon Rainforest

    Objective:
    Students will investigate and understand that survival of rain forest species depends on human actions.

    Materials:
    Copy "Cross-Section of a Rainforest" and "Rainforest Inhabitants" PLT p.165,166, bulletin-board paper for tree, paper, markers, pictures of rain forest animals

    Procedures:

    1. Read The Great Kapok Tree by Lynne Cherry.
    2. a. Compare the inhabitants of tropical rain forests with temperate rain forests.
      b. Write a story about the inhabitants of a temperate rain forest (e.g., "The Great Sequoia Tree").
    3. Do activity "The Great Kapok Tree" UNITES V2 (3) p. 28.
    4. Copy "Cross-Section of a Rainforest" and "Rainforest Inhabitants" PLT p.165,166.
    5. Construct a bulletin-board paper tree chart of animals in a Kapok tree.
    6. Use The Great Kapok Tree to place animals at the correct levels (emergent, canopy, under story, forest floor) of the tree.
    7. Research rain forest inhabitants and measures taken to protect specific species.
    Evaluation:
    Assess student ability to transfer information from survival of tropical rain forest species to temperate rain forest species.

    SOL:

  • Science:
  • 3.1 Plan and conduct investigations
    3.10 Study survival of a species
  • Math:
  • 3.14 Estimate and use actual measuring devices
    3.21 Collect data and construct a bar graph
    3.22 Read and interpret data represented in graphs
  • English:
  • Oral Language:
    3.1 Use communication skills in group activities
    Reading/Literature:
    3.4 Use strategies to read a variety of printed materials
    3.5 Demonstrate comprehension of a variety materials
    Writing:
    3.7 Write descriptive paragraphs
    Research:
    3.10 Record information from resources
    Return to Lesson Index

    Lesson 14: Survival of Species

    Brazilian Rainforest

    Objective:
    Students will investigate and understand efforts taken to save the rain forests from destruction.

    Materials:
    Newsprint, magazine cut-outs of rain forest plant and animals, glue, scissors

    Procedures:

    1. Read One Day in the Tropical Rain Forest by Jean Craighead George.
    2. Do activity "One Day in the Tropical Rain Forest" UNITES V2 (3) p. 26.
    3. a. Make a time line of daily events from the book.
      b. Sequence the events into a story.
    4. Research possible solutions to rain forest destruction.
    5. a. Think of a plan.
      b. Consider all the natural resources in a rain forest.
      c. Make rain forest collage.
    6. Present plan to the class.
    SOL:
  • Science:
  • 3.1 Plan and conduct investigations
    3.10 Study survival of a species
  • Math:
  • 3.15 Tell time using a analog or digital watch
  • English:
  • Oral Language:
    3.1 Use communication skills in group activities
    Reading/Literature:
    3.4 Use strategies to read a variety of printed materials
    3.5 Demonstrate comprehension of a variety materials
    Writing:
    3.7 Write descriptive paragraphs
    Research:
    3.10 Record information from resources
    Return to Lesson Index

    Lesson 15: Survival of Species

    SeaWorld Rainforest

    Objective:
    Students will investigate and understand the survival of the species of animals in other areas of the world.

    Materials:
    Tagboard, die, markers, colored pencils, game markers, file cards

    Procedures:

    1. Read Jumanji by Chris Van Allsburg.
    2. Do activity "Jumanji" UNITES V2 (3) p. 14.
    3. Construct the game board "Jumanji".
    4. a. Follow the directions.
      b. Write clues; draw the game board, and write directions to the game.
    5. Play the game until someone gets to the Golden City.
    6. Compare animals found in an African jungle with those found in an Asian jungle.
    Evaluation:
    Assess student abilities to simulate survival of the species in a game board format.

    SOL:

  • Science:
  • 3.1 Plan and conduct investigations
    3.10 Study survival of a species
  • Math:
  • 3.14 Estimate and use actual measuring devices
    3.21 Collect data and construct a bar graph
    3.22 Read and interpret data represented in graphs
  • English:
  • Oral Language:
    3.1 Use communication skills in group activities
    Reading/Literature:
    3.4 Use strategies to read a variety of printed Materials
    3.5 Demonstrate comprehension of a variety materials
    Writing:
    3.7 Write descriptive paragraphs
    Research:
    3.10 Record information from resources
    Return to Lesson Index

    Lesson 16: Plant and Animal Diversity
    "Habitat Pen Pals" PLT p. 18

     Endangered Species Around the World
    Fish and Wildlife Endangered Species Program

    Objective:
    Students will learn about diversity of habitats and write letters form inhabitants perspective.

    Materials:
    Paper, envelopes, wildlife magazines, tape

    Procedures:

    1. Read Animals Animals by Eric Carle.
    2. Suggest habitats (i.e., places where plant or animals live) such as park, pond, forest, river, meadow).
    3. Gather habitats and animals from magazines (e.g., Ranger Rick, National Geographic, Big Backyard).
    4. Tape animals under appropriate habitat (e.g., koala=Australian, penguin=Antarctic, polar bear=Arctic)
    5. Assign each student an animal identity and a pen pal.
    6. Research, and answer questions (PLT p. 19) about animal identities.
    7. Deliver letters to pen pal.
    Evaluation:
    Assess student abilities to correctly match animals with their habitats.

    SOL:

  • Science:
  • 3.1 Plan and conduct investigations
    3.6 Study plant and animal diversity
  • Math:
  • 3.14 Estimate and use actual measuring devices
  • English:
  • Oral Language:
    3.1 Use communication skills in group activities
    Reading/Literature:
    3.4 Use strategies to read a variety of printed materials
    3.5 Demonstrate comprehension of a variety materials
    Writing:
    3.7 Write descriptive paragraphs
    Research:
    3.10 Record information from resources
    Return to Lesson Index

    Lesson 17: Plant and Animal Diversity
    "Wildlife is Everywhere" Project WILD p. 20


     Objective:
    Students will understand humans and wildlife share environments by investigating surroundings.
    Materials:
    String (optional)
    Procedures:

    1. Read Chipmunk Song by Joanne Ryder.
    2. a. Pretend that you are the chipmunk in the story.
      b. Compose your own version of "My Chipmunk Song".
    3. Investigate the classroom for signs of life.
    4. Search out of doors for signs of wildlife.
    5. a. Graph results of search by section where animals were found.
      b. Interpret graph with students.
    6. Share experiences from these mini-field trips.
    Evaluation:
    Assess student abilities to interpret the results from the wildlife search.

    SOL:

  • Science:
  • 3.1 Plan and conduct investigations
    3.6 Study plant and animal diversity
  • Math:
  • 3.21 Collect data and construct a bar graph
    3.22 Read and interpret data represented in graphs
  • English:
  • Oral Language:
    3.1 Use communication skills in group activities
    Reading/Literature:
    3.4 Use strategies to read a variety of printed materials
    3.5 Demonstrate comprehension of a variety materials
    Writing:
    3.7 Write descriptive paragraphs
    Return to Lesson Index

    Lesson 18: Plant and Animal Diversity
    "Habitracks" Project WILD p. 36

    A Trip Through the National Zoo

    Objectives:

  • Students will identify basic components of a habitat (food, water, shelter and space in a suitable arrangement).

  •  

     
     
     
     
     
     
     

    Materials:
    Habitat maps, task cards, tape, scissors, pencils, small plastic bags, sponges, tempera paint, bulletin-board paper

    Procedures:

    1. Read Animal Tracks by Arthur Dorrus.
    2. a. Make animal tracks (sponge prints) using animal tracks from the book.
      b. Write a story about your animal tracks.
    3. Before activity:
    4. a. Choose different animals from the book (Animal Tracks) to draw "tracks".
      b. Place the animal tracks on a map of the school grounds, one animal per map.
      c. Make colored task cards with symbol needs (food, water, shelter, space) for each animal (e.g., bear=brown food, water, shelter, space task cards).
      d. Hide cards outdoors.
    5. During activity:
    6. a. Teams of three try to track the assigned animal from the scattered task cards.
      b. In ten minutes, record where teams found the task cards for their animal.
    Evaluation:
    Assess student abilities to match the animal with its tracks.

    SOL:

  • Science:
  • 3.1 Plan and conduct investigations
    3.6 Study plant and animal diversity
  • Math:
  • 3.21 Collect data and construct a bar graph
    3.22 Read and interpret data represented in graphs
  • English:
  • Oral Language:
    3.1 Use communication skills in group activities
    Reading/Literature:
    3.4 Use strategies to read a variety of printed materials
    3.5 Demonstrate comprehension of a variety materials
    Writing:
    3.7 Write descriptive paragraphs
    Return to Lesson Index

    Lesson 19: Animal Diversity
    "How Many Bears Can Live in This Forest" Project WILD p. 134

    SeaWorld Animal Information Database

    Objective:
    Students will investigate and understand the major component of habitat and identify a limiting factor.

    Materials:
    Five colors of construction paper, felt pen, envelope, blindfold

    Procedures:

    1. Read The Biggest Bear by Robert McCloskey.
    2. a. Make a semantic map of all the places the boy brought the bear.
      b. Retell the story by writing it in your own words.
    3. Compare the plight of The Biggest Bear with bears in the wild.
    4. Use the chart (Project WILD p. 135) to make up 2"x 2" index cards.
    5. Scatter the colored cards.
    6. Assign students to be crippled, blinded, and mother bear with two cubs.
    7. Students (bears) begin gathering food.
    8. Each bear must gather 80% of its food to survive.
    9. Graph a chart of bears surviving after the activity.
    Evaluation:
    Assess student abilities to accurately count and graph surviving bears

    SOL:

  • Science:
  • 3.1 Plan and conduct investigations
    3.6 Study animal diversity
  • Math:
  • 3.21 Collect data and construct a bar graph
    3.22 Read and interpret data represented in graphs
  • English:
  • Oral Language:
    3.1 Use communication skills in group activities
    Reading/Literature:
    3.4 Use strategies to read a variety of printed materials
    3.5 Demonstrate comprehension of a variety materials
    Writing:
    3.7 Write descriptive paragraphs
    Return to Lesson Index

    Lesson 20: Plant and Animal Diversity

    Animal Photos

    Objective:
    Students will investigate the plant and animal diversity on a fictional island.

    Materials:
    Copy Wild Island (UNITES V2 (3) p. 10), 1" block grid paper, modeling clay, Easter grass, markers, popsicle sticks

    Procedures:

    1. Read My Father’s Dragon by Gannet.
    2. Design Wild Island from the activity "My Father’s Dragon" UNITES V2 (3) p. 8.
    3. a. Draw a compass rose, key, and scale on Wild Island map.
      b. Build Wild Island to a larger scale (1"squared-grid paper).
    4. Share island communities with others.
    5. Research island communities.
    6. Write reports on island communities.
    7. Present reports to the class.
    Evaluation:
    Assess student abilities to transfer map skills to other situations.

    SOL:

  • Science:
  • 3.1 Plan and conduct investigations
    3.6 Study plant and animal diversity
  • Math:
  • 3.14 Estimate and use actual measuring devices
    3.21 Collect data and construct a bar graph
    3.22 Interpret data represented picture graphs
  • English:
  • Oral Language:
    3.1 Use communication skills in group activities
    3.2 Present brief oral reports
    Reading/Literature:
    3.4 Use strategies to read a variety of printed materials
    3.5 Demonstrate comprehension of materials
    3.6 Read a variety of fiction and nonfiction selections
    Writing:
    3.7 Write descriptive paragraphs
    3.8 Write across content areas
    Research:
    3.10 Record information from resources
    Return to Lesson Index

    Lesson 21: Plant and Animal Diversity

     Penguins
    Polar Bears

    Objective:
    Students will investigate and understand the requirements an animal needs in captivity.

    Materials:
    1"block grid paper, Styrofoam blocks for ice shelters, modeling clay, markers

    Procedures:

    1. Read aloud Mr. Popper’s Penguins by Atwater.
    2. Research animal requirements in zoo enclosures.
    3. Design a habitat for penguins from the activity "Mr. Popper’s Penguins" UNITES V2 (3) p. 20.
    4. a. Design and build a suitable habitat for penguins in your home.
      b. Provide for food, water, shelter, and space needs for the penguins.
      c. Construct a model habitat on 1"-square block paper.
    Evaluation:
    Assess student’s ability to transfer habitat needs to another animal such as "Polar Bears in Phoenix?" Project WILD p.120.

    SOL:

  • Science:
  • 3.1 Plan and conduct investigations
    3.6 Study plant and animal diversity
  • Math:
  • 3.14 Estimate and use actual measuring devices
    3.21 Collect data and construct a bar graph
    3.22 Interpret data represented picture graphs
  • English:
  • Oral Language:
    3.1 Use communication skills in group activities
    3.2 Present brief oral reports
    Reading/Literature:
    3.4 Use strategies to read a variety of printed materials
    3.5 Demonstrate comprehension of materials
    3.6 Read a variety of fiction and nonfiction selections
    Writing:
    3.7 Write descriptive paragraphs
    3.8 Write across content areas
    Research:
    3.10 Record information from resources
    Return to Lesson Index

    Lesson 22: Plant and Animal Diversity
    "People, Places, and Things" PLT p. 280

    City Space Project: Help Us Build a City!

    Objectives:
    Students will investigate and understand plant and animal diversity in human communities.

    Materials:
    Tagboard, markers, shoe boxes, community map, rulers, tape, centimeter (cm) paper

    Procedures:

    1. Read Roxaboxen by McLerran.
    2. Research buildings (e.g., library, police station, fire station, businesses) and the services it provides to your community.
    3. Design Our Town USA using the activity "Roxaboxen" UNITES V2 (3) p.24.
    4. Discuss communities as places where people work, play, provide goods and services.
    5. Share your building and its services with the class.
    Evaluation:
    Assess student abilities to research, build, and share community places

    SOL:

  • Science:
  • 3.1 Plan and conduct investigations
    3.6 Study plant and animal diversity
  • Math:
  • 3.14 Estimate and use actual measuring devices
    3.21 Collect data and construct a bar graph
    3.22 Interpret data represented picture graphs
  • English:
  • Oral Language:
    3.1 Use communication skills in group activities
    3.2 Present brief oral reports
    Reading/Literature:
    3.4 Use strategies to read a variety of printed materials
    3.5 Demonstrate comprehension of materials
    3.6 Read a variety of fiction and nonfiction selections
    Writing:
    3.7 Write descriptive paragraphs
    3.8 Write across content areas
    Research:
    3.10 Record information from resources
    Return to Lesson Index

    Lesson 23: Study Food Chains
    "The Fallen Log"PLT p. 72

     Objective:
    Students will understand how decomposition works within a food chain.

    Materials:
    Log in produce box lined with white-shelf paper, magnifying glasses, student logs

    Procedures:

    1. Read The Grampa Tree by Mike Donahue.
    2. a. Explain how trees are essential to a food chain.
      b. Make a written description of a food chain using Grampa Tree
    3. Examine the log (bark, insects under the bark, age of tree).
    4. Record information in student logs.
    Evaluation:
    Assess student abilities to examine and record information in their logs.
    SOL:
  • Science:
  • 3.1 Plan and conduct investigations
    3.5 Study food chains
  • Math:
  • 3.14 Estimate and use actual measuring devices
  • English:
  • Oral Language:
    3.1 Use communication skills in group activities
    3.2 Present brief oral reports
    Reading/Literature:
    3.4 Use strategies to read a variety of printed materials
    3.5 Demonstrate comprehension of materials
    3.6 Read a variety of fiction and nonfiction selections
    Writing:
    3.7 Write descriptive paragraphs
    3.8 Write across content areas
    Return to Lesson Index

    Lesson 24: Food Chains
    "Nature’s Recyclers" PLT p. 75

    Planting a Garden

    Objective:
    Students will understand how decomposition works in the food chain.

    Materials:
    Sow bugs, food (wood, vegetable scraps, leaves, weeds), baby food jars

    Procedures:

    1. Read Miss Rumphius by Barbara Cooney.
    2. Collect sow bugs from under rocks, logs, leaf litter, and other debris.
    3. Experiment with sow bugs food preferences:
    4. a. Each team tries a different food (wood, vegetable scraps, leaves, weeds).
      b. Record results of sow bug diets on picture graphs.
      c. Make conclusions about what sow bugs eat in the wild.
    Evaluation:
    Assess students abilities to accurately record information from sow bug experiments.

    SOL:

  • Science:
  • 3.1 Plan and conduct investigations
    3.5 Study food chains
  • Math:
  • 3.14 Estimate and use actual measuring devices
    3.21 Collect data and construct a picture graph
    3.22 Interpret data represented picture graphs
  • English:
  • Oral Language:
    3.1 Use communication skills in group activities
    3.2 Present brief oral reports
    Reading/Literature:
    3.4 Use strategies to read a variety of printed materials
    3.5 Demonstrate comprehension of materials
    3.6 Read a variety of fiction and nonfiction selections
    Writing:
    3.7 Write descriptive paragraphs
    3.8 Write across content areas
    Research:
    3.10 Record information from resources
    Return to Lesson Index

    Lesson 25: Animal Adaptations
    "Surprise Terrarium" Project WILD p. 118

    Objective:
    Students will observe an animal that uses camouflage as an adaptation.

    Materials:
    Terrarium with live animal (e.g., praying mantis, leaf hopper, tree frog, lizard), photos of animals using camouflage

    Procedures:

    1. Read The Snail’s Spell by Joanne Ryder.
    2. a. Illustrate the adaptation used by a snail.
      b. Describe adaptations of other animals (e.g., skunk=smell, giraffe=neck, shark=teeth).
    3. Observe the terrarium with the camouflaged animal.
    4. Record observations.
    5. Discuss camouflage (an adaptation that helps animals survive in the wild).
    6. Draw an animal using camouflage.
    SOL:
  • Science:
  • 3.1 Plan and conduct investigations
    3.4 Study animal adaptations
  • Math:
  • 3.14 Estimate and use actual measuring devices
  • English:
  • Oral Language:
    3.1 Use communication skills in group activities
    Reading/Literature:
    3.4 Use strategies to read a variety of printed materials
    3.5 Demonstrate comprehension of materials
    3.6 Read a variety of fiction and nonfiction selections
    Writing:
    3.7 Write descriptive paragraphs
    3.8 Write across content areas
    Return to Lesson Index

    Lesson 26: Animal Adaptations
    "Birds and Worms" PLT p. 77

    Birding on the Web

    Objective:
    Students will use a survival relay uses protective coloration to help animals respond to life needs.

    Materials:
    60 chips (20 each of 3 colors, 15 each of 4 colors, 12 each of 5 colors) to represent worms or bugs, clay, cloth pieces

    Procedures:

    1. Read Animals Should Definitely Not Wear Clothing by Judi and Ron Barrett.
    2. a. Make clothing for clay animals.
      b. Describe in writing how clothing protects your animal.
    3. Play two-team relay by trying to get each bird (student) fed.
    4. a. Each bird (student) flies over area and picks up one worm or bug (chip).
      b. When every bird is fed, that team wins.
    5. Record data on bar graphs.
    Evaluation:
    Assess student abilities to record relay data on bar graphs.

    SOL:

  • Science:
  • 3.1 Plan and conduct investigations
    3.4 Study animal adaptations
  • Math:
  • 3.14 Estimate and use actual measuring devices
    3.21 Collect data and construct a picture graph
    3.22 Interpret data represented picture graphs
  • English:
  • Oral Language:
    3.1 Use communication skills in group activities
    Reading/Literature:
    3.4 Use strategies to read a variety of printed materials
    3.5 Demonstrate comprehension of materials
    3.6 Read a variety of fiction and nonfiction selections
    Writing:
    3.7 Write descriptive paragraphs
    3.8 Write across content areas
    Return to Lesson Index

    Lesson 27: Animal Adaptations
    "Thicket Game" Project WILD p. 112

    Objective:
    Students will investigate and understand how animals are adapted to their environment in order to survive.

    Materials:
    Blindfolds
    Procedures:

    1. Read Just So Stories by Rudyard Kipling (e.g. "How the Leopard Got Its Spots) and do activities from UNITES V2 (3) p.16.
    2. Write your own "Just So Story".
    3. Students become "predator’ and "prey" in this version of "Hide and Seek":
    4. a. One blind-folded predator (student) counts aloud to 20.
      b. Other prey (students) hide in thicket until predator calls them by name.
      c. Each round of play caught prey become predators until all students are captured.
    5. Compare how animal adaptation (camouflage) helped or hindered survival.
    Evaluation:
    Assess student abilities to transfer Just So Stories to a survival activity.

    SOL:

  • Science:
  • 3.1 Plan and conduct investigations
    3.4 Study animal adaptations
  • Math:
  • 3.14 Estimate and use actual measuring devices
  • English:
  • Oral Language:
    3.1 Use communication skills in group activities
    Reading/Literature:
    3.4 Use strategies to read a variety of printed materials
    3.5 Demonstrate comprehension of materials
    3.6 Read a variety of fiction and nonfiction selections
    Writing:
    3.7 Write descriptive paragraphs
    3.8 Write across content areas
    Return to Lesson Index

    Lesson 28: Animal Behavioral and Physical Adaptations
    "Ants on a Twig" Project WILD p. 10


    Objective:
    Students will investigate and understand basic needs of ants and humans.

    Materials:
    Chalk, sidewalk

    Procedures:

    1. Read Two Bad Ants by Chris Van Allsburg.
    2. a. Compare the basic needs of ants to other insects.
      b. Write a story about two other insects (e.g. "Two Bad Bees").
    3. Compare the survival needs of the two bad ants to the survival needs of humans.
    4. Observe ants outdoors for 20 minutes.
    5. a. Draw a picture graph of the ants.
      b. Interpret data from the picture graphs.
    6. Report findings of ant behavior.
    7. Demonstrate ant behavior:
    8. a. Draw a chalk line on the sidewalk.
      b. Two lines of ants (students) must pass each other without falling off the chalk line.
    9. Describe similarities and differences between ants and human basic needs.
    Evaluation:
    Evaluate student abilities to draw and interpret picture graphs of ant behavior.

    SOL:

  • Science:
  • 3.1 Plan and conduct investigations
    3.4 Study animal behavioral and physical adaptations
  • Math:
  • 3.14 Estimate and use actual measuring devices
    3.21 Collect data and construct a picture graph
    3.22 Interpret data represented picture graphs
  • English:
  • Oral Language:
    3.1 Use communication skills in group activities
    Reading/Literature:
    3.4 Use strategies to read a variety of printed materials
    3.5 Demonstrate comprehension of materials
    3.6 Read a variety of fiction and nonfiction selections
    Writing:
    3.7 Write descriptive paragraphs
    3.8 Write across content areas
    Return to Lesson Index

    Lesson 29: Animal Behavioral and Physical Adaptations
    "Seeing is Believing or the Eyes Have It!" Project WILD p. 116

     See the World Through a Bee's Eye!

    Objective:
    Students will identify different kinds of vision as an example of adaptation in animals.

    Materials:
    Kaleidoscope, binoculars or telescope, fish-eye mirror, tagboard, colored cellophane

    Procedures:

    1. Read Glasses Who Needs Them by Lane Smith.
    2. Set up three learning stations within the classroom:
    3. a. One with kaleidoscopes (insects have compound eyes), one with binoculars or telescopes,(predatory birds such as eagles, hawks, owls have telescopic vision), fish-eye mirror (fish have wide-angle vision).
      b. Visit each station.
      c. Try to guess what kinds of animals have each type of vision.
    4. Write a paragraph titled, "I’d like to see like a _______________________."
    5. Make tagboard eyeglasses.
    Evaluation:
    Assess student abilities to simulate different visual adaptations of animals

    SOL:

  • Science:
  • 3.1 Plan and conduct investigations
    3.4 Study animal behavioral and physical adaptations
  • Math:
  • 3.14 Estimate and use actual measuring devices
  • English:
  • Oral Language:
    3.1 Use communication skills in group activities
    Reading/Literature:
    3.4 Use strategies to read a variety of printed materials
    3.5 Demonstrate comprehension of materials
    3.6 Read a variety of fiction and nonfiction selections
    Writing:
    3.7 Write descriptive paragraphs
    3.8 Write across content areas
    Return to Lesson Index

    Lesson 30: Diversity of Plants and Animals
    "Capture, Store and Release" Project WET p.133

     Take a Cool Tour of Wetlands!
    Ground Water Model

    Objective:
    Students will describe how wetlands support a diversity of plants and animals.

    Materials:
    Wetland pictures, aluminum trays, colored water, large-light colored sponge, measuring cups, trowel, cardboard strips

    Procedures:

    1. Read Swamp Angel by Annie Isaacs
    2. a. Evaluate why she was called "swamp angel".
      b. Describe how you would protect wetlands if you were a "swamp angel".
    3. Demonstrate how ground stores water:
    4. a. Pour shallow amount of water in an aluminum tray.
      b. Place a sponge in the water (e.g. like soil).
      c. Make a depression in the sponge (e.g. collects water from stored water).
    5. Simulate surface water helps form wetlands
    6. a. Dampen and distribute sponges.
      b. Explain cutaway portion represents the stream.
      c. Place two pencils or ruler across tray, elevate one end of the tray, and pour colored water into it (banks absorb water and it seeps into surrounding land).
    7. Compare watersheds that do and do not have wetlands.
    8. a. Poke hole in one end of an aluminum tray and prop up other end.
      b. Pour two cups of water on top of tray.
      c. How would the watershed be affected if the wetlands (sponges) were removed?
    Evaluation:
    Evaluate student abilities to accurately simulate a wetland environment.

    SOL:

  • Science:
  • 3.1 Plan and conduct investigations
    3.6 Study diversity of plants and animals
  • Math:
  • 3.14 Estimate and use actual measuring devices
  • English:
  • Oral Language:
    3.1 Use communication skills in group activities
    Reading/Literature:
    3.4 Use strategies to read a variety of printed materials
    3.5 Demonstrate comprehension of materials
    3.6 Read a variety of fiction and nonfiction selections
    Writing:
    3.7 Write descriptive paragraphs
    3.8 Write across content areas
    Return to Lesson Index


    Last Updated:  January 28, 2001